Foster

MABTR cannot operate without foster homes. The more foster homes we have, the more Boston Terriers we can save. We are actively seeking foster families in Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Minnesota, Iowa, and Colorado.

What is a Foster Home?

A foster home is a home where a rescued, unwanted, or otherwise needy Boston Terrier can live and be loved until a permanent home is available that meets his or her special needs. Our foster dogs are in our care on average three to four weeks, though their time in foster care varies widely based on the dog’s condition and the number of applicants at the time that meet his or her needs.

Foster care can also be short-term, where the foster family takes in a dog until he or she can be moved into a long-term foster home once space permits. This usually consists a one- to two-week stay.

Foster homes are not for people who just want to adopt a Boston Terrier. They are for people willing to open their hearts to help Boston Terriers along their way, understanding that he/she will eventually be going to a “forever home.”

Become a Foster

The first step to become a foster is completing our foster application. Please read it carefully, as it thoroughly outlines your responsibilities as a foster. Once received, we will call you for a phone interview.

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Fostering friendships: Carol (left, with Hillary in her arms) and Kim became friends after Kim adopted Max and Madeline, MABTR alumni, from Carol's daughter, Kyla. All three of these dogs could have easily been put to sleep at shelters for their various physical and emotional issues due to previous abuse, but because of the care they received in their MABTR foster homes, they are now well-adjusted dogs who make their new families very happy.

Fostering Friendships: Carol (left, with Hillary in her arms) and Kim became friends after Kim adopted Max and Madeline, MABTR alumni, from Carol’s daughter, Kyla. All three of these dogs could have easily been put to sleep at shelters for their various physical and emotional issues due to previous abuse, but because of the care they received in their MABTR foster home, they are now well-adjusted dogs who make their new families very happy.

A Poem For Fostering

Our paths will cross for only a short time, but while you are in my care I will be devoted to you. If memories of your former life are painful, I will help erase them. No longer will you hunger and I will help to heal your wounds. If your former life was good, I will promise you an even better future.

One day our time together will come to an end and you will go off to your new home, healthy, happy and healed. As a parting gift, I will give you a piece of my heart to remember me by. I may shed a tear . . .not for my loss, but for your gain.

Perhaps our paths may cross again for a fleeting instant and I will be comforted by the aura of love that surrounds you. There will always be a bond between us, though we walk separate paths through this life.

After we reach our heavenly reward our paths may cross again. You may try to return the piece of my heart with thanks for all that I did for you. I will tell you to keep it and thank you for showing me that I could be better than I thought I could be, and that I learned in giving came the greatest gifts.

The pieces of our hearts are like grains of sand. They are pulled along a current beyond our control until they come together and form a safe haven.

I, like you, came to understand what it meant to be saved.

By Jim Willis

 

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Happy Tails Books Boston Terrier BookBill and Friends: “Our poodle had passed on, our daughter had grown, and we were thriving as empty nesters. We shamelessly fawned over dogs in the neighborhood, and fantasized about taking them home (if only for a day or two). When our daughter began fostering Boston Terriers we inadvertently fell into the perfect situation: we instantly became foster grandparents! We play with them and love them as we would with grandchildren, and when our time is through, they go back to their home. The only difference is that they don’t yet have a permanent home and occasionally have special needs. For us, the troubled dogs have been even more fun as we get to see incremental progress each time we catch up with them, which is especially the case with Bill, our daughter’s “failed” foster (one she kept). Maybe for a ‘regular’ dog getting out of a safe spot to get a drink of water is no big deal, but for our permanent and temporary granddogs, it is a chance to celebrate with a piece of cheese—for humans and dogs alike. Yum!” –Carol and Dennis Duffy

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